A syllabus is a contract between a professor and a student. The syllabus outlines what will be taught in a class, what the assignments are, when exams will be, and how grading will be assigned. As a student, you should thoroughly orient yourself with the syllabus for each of your classes. Make sure that you understand what you are expected to do and how to contact the professor, in case you have trouble later in the class.

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A syllabus is a contract between a professor and a student. The syllabus outlines what will be taught in a class, what the assignments are, when exams will be, and how grading will be assigned. As a student, you should thoroughly orient yourself with the syllabus for each of your classes. Make sure that you understand what you are expected to do and how to contact the professor, in case you have trouble later in the class.
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A syllabus is a contract between a professor and a student. The syllabus outlines what will be taught in a class, what the assignments are, when exams will be, and how grading will be assigned. As a student, you should thoroughly orient yourself with the syllabus for each of your classes. Make sure that you understand what you are expected to do and how to contact the professor, in case you have trouble later in the class.
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PSY 325: PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN
Cheri L. Kittrell, M.A., M.A.T.
Summer II 2003: July 7 - August 14
Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:00 p.m. - 10:15 p.m.
Course Objectives
PSY 325 explores gender and the psychology of women as psychological and social factors that influence our experiences in a sociocultural, historical, international, and multi-cultural context. Special emphasis will be given to the exploration of the implications these individual differences have for the lives of women and men and for social scientific theory and inquiry. This class will include discussion of the biological, psychological, social, cognitive, and spiritual origins and implications of gender differences and gender similarities.

Required Reading
   Denmark, F., Rabinowitz, V., & Sechzer, J. (2000). Engendering Psychology. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Lectures will correspond with assigned readings, but will not repeat the text.  The assigned readings from the text or other articles should be read prior to the class period for which they are assigned to facilitate the student's understanding of the terminology commonly used in the discipline of the psychology of women.  In addition, a thorough reading of the assignments should stimulate questions for the student, which can then be brought out during class discussion.  Examinations will cover all information required to be read by students.  Attendance at lectures will provide the student with a clearer picture as to which topics are the most salient and, therefore, likely to appear on the exam.

Office Hours and Contact Information
I am very interested in helping students learn the material for this course. I hope that you will utilize the class website, feel free to e-mail me, and/or make use of my office hours (held in Plant Hall 500). If you have questions about course content or other problems related to the class, you are able to contact me in the following ways:
--You may e-mail me at ckittrell@ut.edu to discuss the problem or make an appointment for non-office hours.
-- Another option for students in need of help is to use the links from the class website at psychclasses.homestead.com to chat with classmates, post to the bulletin board, use help links, or check on assignments.
--Office hours will be posted on my office door (PH 500).

If you need to speak with me (and the above options do not meet your needs), please contact me by e-mail to make an appointment.

Attendance Policy
It is my opinion that students are wholly responsible for their own actions.  In addition, it is only realistic to acknowledge that emergencies happen to everyone.  Based upon these presuppositions, while I must formally take attendance, attendance does not factor directly into a student's grade.  Nevertheless, it has been my experience that it is nearly impossible to receive a good grade in a course without consistent attendance.  Please be advised that if you must miss a class session for any reason, it is up to the student to make arrangements to obtain the notes, assignments, and/or handouts from that class from another student.  Students will not be excused from correctly completing assignments or knowing material for the exams due to absence. Please carefully choose a classmate from whom to obtain your notes or send a tape recorder to class in your absence.

ADA Compliance
If there is any student who has special needs because of any disability, please go directly to Ms. Janet Casey in PH 409 to report your needs and provide documentation of your disability for certification.  Please feel free to discuss this issue with me, in private, if you need more information.

Grading
There will be two exams, each worth 30% of the final grade.  Exams will be comprised of multiple-choice, fill-in-the blank, short answer, and essay. There will also be several short written assignments and a presentation, which comprise the final 40% of the grade. 

Letter grades will be based on the following distribution:
A: 92 - 100  A/B: 88 - 91  B: 82 - 87  B/C: 78 - 81  
C: 72 - 77    C/D: 68 - 71         D: 63 - 67      F: <62

Make-up exams will only be administered in the event of an emergency, as determined by the professor. In the event of an emergency, students should bring their excuse (i.e. hospital bill, doctor's note, etc.) to the next class meeting. Late written assignments will not be accepted. If you must miss a class, please e-mail the assignment to the address listed above by 5 p.m. on the day the assignment is due. Do not e-mail assignments for any other reason. Assignments should be printed out in advance so that computer or printer difficulties will not interfere with the timeliness of assignments. Presentations will only be rescheduled in the event of an emergency, which should be documented in the previously described manner.

Written Assignments
The three written assignments for this course are designed to give students an opportunity to write academic papers based upon first-hand research in the psychology of women. Assignment requirements are provided below.

Assignment sheets detailing the specific requirements for each assignment are attached to this syllabus.

--It is up to the student to look at the course schedule, determine when each assignment is due, and pace him/herself accordingly.

--Students should carefully read the directions for each assignment and make certain that that they comply with all required steps.

--Students should make an appointment to speak with me, if they find that they are having difficulty with any of the assignments or if they simply wish to clarify some aspect of the assignment.

--These assignments are not to be completed in groups and students should avoid plagiarizing other students, the Internet, or other source materials.

--Papers should be completed with care and effort and should reflect a college-level involvement with the topic. Work that is careless or inappropriate for the current level of academic achievement will receive.

--Papers should demonstrate an understanding of the concept and principles presented in the course and give evidence of your critical thinking skills and ability to synthesize and apply course material.

--Correct grammar, spelling, and APA style for citations and references (it is not necessary to complete the body of papers in APA style) are essential.

--Quality of your discussion of the questions/issues (Be sure to develop your points; remember that one of your goals should be to show me how much you know.)

Plagiarism
Students are required to do their own work. No student should turn in any work done by someone else under the false pretense that it is his or her own work. In other words, credit should be given where credit is due. Students should not solicit ideas from other students, reproduce (even with adjustments) another student's work, copy source materials (without proper quotation and citation), or reuse materials from other classes. Students should turn in original work produced through good scholarship (i.e. utilizing research materials and texts to formulate one's own theories.) Students who plagiarize their assignments will fail that assignment (and possibly the course) and be referred to the Dean for disciplinary procedures.

Course Schedule
Please note: The professor reserves the right to reissue the course schedule with deletions, additions, or revisions during the term (based upon class progress or other mediating factors).  Students are responsible for keeping up with revisions issued or discussed during class sessions.

Session:Scheduled Topic/Assignments:Assigned Reading:
July 8Introduction/Course Overview
       The women's movement/men's movement
       Exploring Sex and GenderChapter One
Gender Identity and Identity Disorders
      Gender-appropriate language and writing
Communication and gender (Verbal and Non-verbal)
Male/female gender role theory and development
Gender stereotypes and roles

July 10     Religious Context/Gender in MythChapter Two
Women Are Evil and Other Morals of Religious Story
The witch hunt continues

July 15     The Biology of Sex and GenderChapter Three
       Estrogen, Progesterone, and Testosterone: The Chemical Female
       Exam Review

July 17     Exam One
Assignment One Due

July 22    Grade Review
      Global/Cultural ContextChapter Four
                     Dividing Lines for a Universal Femininity
             Socialization and Development FactorsChapter Five
                     Why do women go to the bathroom in groups??

July 24    Ability and AchievementChapter Six
             Anything Men Can Do Women Can Do (For Less Pay)
                     The World of Work and Higher EducationChapter Seven
                     The Glass Ceiling and the Mrs. Dr. Dilemma

July 29    Sexuality/Intimate RelationshipsChapters Eight and Nine
                     Single Sex in the City
                     Romance and Marriage: Does Prince Charming Really Exist?
                     Divorce and its Effects on Women

July 31    Gender, Violence, and ExploitationChapter Eleven
                     Sexual Harassment
                     Issues in Mental Health Chapter Twelve
                     PMS and Other Things that Make Women Crazy
      Exam Review

August 5         Exam Two
                     Assignment Two Due

August 7         Grade Review
Physical Health: Issues Across the LifespanChapter Thirteen
                      Parenting and Motherhood
                     Hating motherhood
                     Help! I'm turning into my mother

August 12A Reflection on the Future Chapter Fourteen
              Aging for American Women: Can we cope without Botox?
              Homemakers and Serial Killers
                     Assignment Three Presentations Due
Exam Review

August 14Exam Three